Awards Archive

Awards received by Lincoln Laboratory staff
January 2008 to August 2011

Lincoln Laboratory Bike-to-Work Team pedals to grand prize award in MassCommuter Challenge
  Posted August 2011

David Conrad receives MDA Director's Pinnacle Award
  Posted August 2011

Kenneth Chadwick receives U.S. Army Outstanding Civilian Service Medal
  Posted August 2011

MIT Lincoln Laboratory researchers honored with best paper awards
  Posted July 2011

Jeremy Muldavin named Outstanding Young Engineer
  Posted June 2011

Eighteen Lincoln Laboratory employees receive
2011 MIT Excellence Awards

  Posted March 2011

MIT Lincoln Laboratory earns fifth Superior security rating
  Posted March 2011

David Ebel and William Ross receive 2010 MIT Lincoln Laboratory Technical Excellence Awards
Technical awards for early career achievement, best paper, and best invention also presented
  
Posted March 2011

Mohamed Abouzahra named 2011 IEEE Fellow
  Posted January 2011

Eric Dauler named 2010 Young Innovator of the Year
  Posted November 2010

Two MIT Lincoln Laboratory leaders receive Air Force Civilian Service Awards

Photo of H.K. Burke

Dr. Hsiao-hua Burke

Photo of R. Shin

Dr. Robert Shin

Dr. Hsiao-hua K. Burke, Head of the Air and Missile Defense Technology Division, received the Air Force Award for Meritorious Civilian Service, and Dr. Robert T-I. Shin, Head of the ISR and Tactical Systems Division, received the Air Force Award for Exemplary Civilian Service, in recognition of their service on the Air Force Scientific Advisory Board from October 2006 to September 2010. The awards were presented at the 6 October meeting of the Board.

Dr. Burke was commended for her leadership as chair of the "Airborne Tactical Laser Feasibility for Gunship Operations" study, her support to four science and technology reviews, and her work on studies that investigated the utility of small satellites, the rapid checkout of space systems, and next-generation electronics. Dr. Shin was recognized for his participation in studies on cyber warfare, alternative sources of energy for Air Force bases, technology challenges for kinetic effects, and the Air Force's technology road map. 

Posted November 2010


MIT Lincoln Laboratory receives Tech Citizenship Award

    The Laboratory is recognized for its strong commitment to community service

MIT Lincoln Laboratory is among the twenty-three recipients of a 2010 Tech Citizenship Award presented by Mass High Tech to technology companies and organizations that provide substantial support to schools, nonprofits, and charities through educational outreach, fundraising events, or community giving.

Lincoln Laboratory was recognized for its strong community outreach program, a significant portion of which is focused on science, technology, engineering, and mathematics education for students in kindergarten to high school. In the past year, more than 10,000 students from the region have enjoyed science and technology presentations given by technical staff members either at local schools or at the Laboratory. In the 2009 to 2010 school year, volunteers in the robotics outreach program mentored eight teams that participated in For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology (FIRST) robotics competitions. The Laboratory participates in four educational outreach programs coordinated by MIT's Office of Engineering Outreach Programs to reach out to students in underserved communities. In 2010, staff members gave approximately 5,250 volunteer hours to the Laboratory's nineteen educational programs for K–12 students.

The outreach program also includes ten charitable giving initiatives. These projects include the long-running Support Our Troops program that collects snack items, books, movies, and toiletries and packages them each week for mailing to U.S. troops stationed in Iraq and Afghanistan; the annual Hike and Bike the Berkshires fundraiser that this year brought in over $15,000 for the Multiple Sclerosis (MS) Society, earning for the Laboratory the New England MS chapter's designation "#1 Corporate Team"; food and clothing drives; and the Memory Walk that brought in $13,000 in pledges for the Alzheimer's Association of Massachusetts and New Hampshire.

Posted November 2010


MIT Lincoln Laboratory receives IEEE Professional Development Award

MIT Lincoln Laboratory was named a 2010 recipient of the IEEE Educational Activities Board Employer Professional Development Award for its "exemplary leadership in providing programs for its employees, IEEE members, and other professionals for continuing education and professional development."

The award honors the Laboratory's strong commitment to facilitating the professional development of its staff and recognizes the breadth of the Laboratory’s program: a broad range of courses coordinated through the Technical Education and the Training and Development programs; the opportunities for acquiring advanced degrees through avenues such as the Lincoln Scholars and the distance-learning programs with Carnegie Mellon University and Penn State; the many seminars presented at the Laboratory by technical staff members or experts from universities and research institutes; and the nationally known workshops that bring together researchers from academia, industry, and the military.

The IEEE (Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers) is the world's largest association for engineering professionals engaged in advanced technologies. The organization is dedicated to promoting innovation and technological excellence. For more than a century, the IEEE has sponsored various programs that honor both individual and corporate achievements in education, research, and service.

Posted October 2010


Scott Stadler named to the Air Force Scientific Advisory Board

Photo of Scott StadlerDr. J. Scott Stadler, Head of MIT Lincoln Laboratory's Communication Systems and Cyber Security Division, has been named to the Air Force’s Scientific Advisory Board (AFSAB). The AFSAB serves to connect the Air Force with the nation's scientific community, promoting the exchange of scientific and technical information. The board's studies on a broad range of topics pertinent to Air Force programs provide independent technical advice and recommendations to the Air Force senior leadership.

As Division Head, Dr. Stadler directs a portfolio of technology development, data collection, architecture definition, and system prototype programs for government communication and cyber systems. He has been involved in the design, development, and operation of a number of satellite systems, both at Lincoln Laboratory and in industry. At the Laboratory, he has led research efforts focused on the seamless integration of wireless and terrestrial packet data networks, including long/ultralong-haul fiber networks, metropolitan area fiber access networks, and airborne/satellite wireless access networks.

Prior to his appointment as Division Head, Dr. Stadler served as Leader of the Advanced Lasercom Systems and Operations Group and Assistant Leader in the Advanced Networks and Applications Group. He holds a BS degree from Worcester Polytechnic Institute, an MS degree from the University of Southern California, and a PhD degree from the University of Pennsylvania, all in electrical engineering.

Posted October 2010


Walter Morrow, MIT Lincoln Laboratory Director Emeritus, receives Outstanding Public Service Award

Photo of Walter E. MorrowWalter E. Morrow, Director of MIT Lincoln Laboratory from 1977 to 1998, was honored by the Department of Defense (DoD) with its Outstanding Public Service Award for "exceptionally outstanding public service as Member and Senior Fellow of the Defense Science Board, Office of the Under Secretary of Defense (Acquisition, Technology & Logistics), from January 1987 to September 2009."

During his tenure on the Defense Science Board, Mr. Morrow led eleven task forces and summer studies, many of which have been used in guiding the direction of defense acquisition and in determining critical DoD investments. He was commended for his broad understanding of national security issues and his ability to access the best science and technical advice, resulting in balanced and thorough recommendations.

Mr. Morrow joined Lincoln Laboratory in 1951 and, in 1952, devised what was probably the world's first transistor flip-flop. He was active in the early research and development of ionospheric and tropospheric communication techniques. Included among his many achievements are advances in orbital scatter communication, orbital dipole experimentation, communication satellites, lunar and planetary radar studies, and a patent for a synchronous satellite. He also pursued research in electric power plants using electrolytic cell-fuel cell combinations. Prior to his appointment as Director of Lincoln Laboratory, Mr. Morrow served as Head of the Communications Division and both Assistant and Associate Director of the Laboratory. He currently is a Director Emeritus.

Mr. Morrow has served on many advisory committees, notably on the Chief of Naval Operations Executive Panel, the U.S. Air Force Scientific Advisory Board, and the NASA Advisory Council. He is the recipient of numerous awards, including the Edwin Howard Armstrong Achievement Award from the IEEE Communications Society and the Armed Forces Communications and Electronics Association Medal of Merit Award. He holds BS and MS degrees in electrical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Posted September 2010


MIT Lincoln Laboratory receives five R&D 100 Awards
  Posted August 2010


Daniel Ripin to participate in 2010 U.S. Frontiers of Engineering Symposium

Photo of Daniel RipinDr. Daniel J. Ripin, assistant leader of the Laser Technology and Applications Group at Lincoln Laboratory, was selected to take part in the National Academy of Engineering's (NAE's) 2010 U.S. Frontiers of Engineering Symposium, which brings together engineers who are performing exceptional research and technical work.

At Lincoln Laboratory, Dr. Ripin has focused on the development of advanced solid-state laser technology. He led a Laboratory effort to demonstrate power scaling of a novel cryogenically cooled laser capable of efficiently generating light with ideal beam quality. Since successful completion of the proof-of-principle demonstration, Dr. Ripin has been leading a multidisciplinary Laboratory-wide project to package and flight qualify a cryogenic laser for fielding into an airborne platform. He has also worked on mode-locked lasers and bioagent sensor development. He holds a BS degree in physics from Emory University and a PhD degree in physics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

At this year's symposium, being held from 23 to 25 September at the IBM Learning Center in Armonk, New York, Dr. Ripin will join 85 other young (ages 30 to 45) engineers from industry, academia, and government in sessions on cloud computing, autonomous aerospace systems, and engineering inspired by biology. Symposium participants were chosen from among more than 265 candidates nominated by organizations or fellow engineers.

According to Charles M. Vest, president of the NAE, "The U.S. Frontiers of Engineering program is an opportunity for a diverse group of this country's most promising young engineers to gather together and discuss multidisciplinary ways of leading us into the economy of tomorrow."

Dr. Bernard S. Meyerson, IBM fellow and vice president of innovation, is a featured speaker at the 2010 symposium. Other speakers represent major universities, government centers, and industry. This is the sixteenth annual symposium directed by the NAE, an independent nonprofit institute providing advice to the government and the public. Sponsors for the 2010 U.S. Frontiers of Engineering are IBM, The Grainger Foundation, Air Force Office of Scientific Research, Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, Department of Defense (DDR&E), National Science Foundation, Microsoft Research, and Cummins Inc.

Posted July 2010


Roger Sudbury receives 2010 Distinguished Service Award of the IEEE Microwave Theory and Techniques Society

Photo of Roger SudburyRoger W. Sudbury, a member of the Director's Office at MIT Lincoln Laboratory until his death on August 22, was selected for the 2010 Distinguished Service Award of the IEEE Microwave Theory and Techniques (MTT) Society to honor his "outstanding and dedicated service to the advancement of the MTT Society." The award was presented by Prof. Samir El-Ghazali, President of the IEEE MTT Society, at the awards banquet held on 26 May during the IEEE MTT 2010 International Microwave Symposium in Anaheim, California.

Mr. Sudbury was a Fellow of the IEEE and served the IEEE in many capacities. He was a member of the IEEE Technical Activities Board and its Strategic Planning and Review Committee. He was the chair of the Conference Publications Committee, a Technical Activities Board liaison to the Regional Activities Board, and a vice chair of the IEEE Membership Development Committee. He served as the chair of the Continuing Professional Education Committee and on the IEEE Educational Activities Board. A Past President of the IEEE Microwave Theory and Techniques Society, he served as the MTT Awards Committee Chair and on the IEEE Awards Board Presentation and Publicity Committee. He also served on the Steering Committee of the IEEE International Microwave Symposium and its Technical Program Committee. He was a member of the IEEE Board of Directors.

During his 41 years at Lincoln Laboratory, Mr. Sudbury served as the Laboratory's Executive Officer, as associate group leader in the Systems Engineering and the Experimental Systems groups, and as associate manager of Lincoln Laboratory's Kiernan Reentry Measurements Site in the Marshall Islands, Kwajalein Atoll. He led the development of high-frequency solid-state components for active-element phased-array radars. While leading the development of GaAs monolithic circuits at the Laboratory, he served as advisor to the government on GaAs multichip transceiver module development. He was involved in the fielding and operation of Cobra Eye, an airborne infrared data-collection platform.

He earned a BEE with highest honors from the Georgia Institute of Technology and SM and Engineer (EE) degrees from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He served in the U.S. Army, attaining the rank of Captain, and was a member of Phi Kappa Phi, Sigma Xi, Tau Beta Pi, Eta Kappa Nu, and Phi Eta Sigma honor societies.

Posted June 2010


MIT Lincoln Laboratory earns fourth Superior security rating

The U.S. Air Force 66th Security Forces Squadron awarded MIT Lincoln Laboratory a "Superior" security rating for 2009. This rating was based upon the cumulative results of twelve comprehensive security inspections conducted on divisions, groups, and departments randomly chosen for evaluation. The Laboratory earned high ratings on security reviews performed between January and December 2009. The Laboratory's continued compliance with National Industrial Security Program requirements has earned it this fourth consecutive "Superior" rating.

Photo of group leaders and division heads whose groups and divisions were evaluated in 2009 security review
 
Front row, left to right, Colonel Charles Thompson, Commander, 66th Air Base Wing, Hanscom Air Force Base, who presented the plaque honoring Lincoln Laboratory for earning the 2009 Superior security rating; Shawn Daley, Chief Security Officer; and Dr. Eric D. Evans, Director. Leadership of the divisions and groups that achieved high scores in the 2009 security review are (from back to front rows, left to right) Dr. David Shaver, Division Head, Advanced Technology Division; Douglas Marquis, Group Leader, Net-centric Operations Group; James Flavin, Assistant Division Head, Homeland Protection and Air Traffic Control Division; Dr. Michael Shatz, Group Leader, Engineering Analysis Group; Dr. Frederick Walther, Assistant Group Leader, Advanced Lasercom Systems and Operations Group; Dr. Gary Hatke, Group Leader, Advanced Sensor Techniques Group; Dr. Daniel O’Connor, Group Leader, BMDS Integration Group; Robert Bond, Group Leader, Embedded and High Performance Computing Group; Dr. Robert Shin, Division Head, ISR and Tactical Systems Division; Dr. David Whited, Group Leader, Optical Systems Technology Group; and Paula Ward, Assistant Group Leader, Control Systems Engineering Group.


Posted June 2010


Thomas Macdonald receives AFCEA Meritorious Award for Engineering

Photo of Thomas MacdonaldDr. Thomas G. Macdonald, leader of the Wideband Tactical Networking Group at MIT Lincoln Laboratory, received the 2010 Armed Forces Communications and Electronics Association (AFCEA) Meritorious Award for Engineering. The award honors individuals who have shown outstanding scientific and technical accomplishments that support AFCEA's mission and goals.

AFCEA is an international organization that serves the military, government, industry, and academia as an ethical forum for advancing professional knowledge in the disciplines of communications, electronics, intelligence, and information systems.

Dr. Macdonald's award recognizes his leadership of the Group that recently completed two prototyping efforts with the potential to improve military satellite communication capabilities for the warfighter. The first prototype, a novel mobile ground terminal for use with extremely high-frequency satellites, can be used on the move even as adversaries are trying to disrupt communications with electronic attacks. The second effort was to create a high-data-rate waveform that long-range unmanned aerial vehicles can use to fully exploit the recently launched Wideband Global System (WGS) satellites. Dr. Macdonald's award also recognizes his continuing contributions to AFCEA, such as chairing the unclassified technical program for AFCEA's 2009 Military Communications Conference (MILCOM 2009).

Since joining Lincoln Laboratory in 2001, Dr. Macdonald has participated in a wide range of satellite and terrestrial radio programs. His work has covered a variety of areas in addition to the terminal prototypes mentioned above, including networking for mobile military forces, dynamic link adaptation techniques for satellite systems, and channel characterization for free-space optical communications systems. He has coauthored two book chapters and has published extensively in conference proceedings and journals. He is also the editor of an upcoming special issue of the IEEE Journal on Selected Areas in Communications, which is focused on military communications and networking. Dr. Macdonald holds a BS degree from Clarkson University and MS and PhD degrees from Clemson University, all in electrical engineering.

Posted May 2010


MIT Lincoln Laboratory and MIT research team is the recipient of the 2009 George E. Smith Award

Researchers from MIT Lincoln Laboratory's Advanced Technology Division and from MIT were honored with the IEEE Electron Devices Society 2009 George E. Smith Award for the best paper published in 2009 in the journal IEEE Electron Devices Letters.

Dr. Jakub T. Kedzierski, Dr. Craig L. Keast, Paul D. Healey, and Dr. Peter W. Wyatt of Lincoln Laboratory, and Prof. Jing Kong and graduate students Pei-Lan Hsu and Alfonso Reina from MIT were recognized for the paper "Graphene-on-Insulator Transistors Made Using C on Ni Chemical-Vapor Deposition." The paper presents the team's pioneering work on graphene-on-insulator electronics, reporting on some of the first transistors measured on graphene-on-insulator material.

Posted May 2010


MIT Lincoln Laboratory researchers are among MDA Technology Achievement Award recipients

Lieutenant General Patrick J. O'Reilly, director of the Missile Defense Agency (MDA), presented MDA 2010 Technology Achievement Awards to two teams on which MIT Lincoln Laboratory technical staff served—the Theater Critical Measurements Program team and the Burnt Frost team. The awards were presented at a ceremony during the Eighth Annual U.S. Missile Defense Conference held in March.

Dr. Keh-Ping Dunn, Senior Staff in the BMDS Integration Group; Dr. Daniel A. O'Connor, leader of the BMDS Integration Group; Dr. Donald S. Coe, leader of the Rapid Prototyping Group; David L. Immerman, technical staff in the Optical Systems Engineering Group; and Christopher B. Johnson, administrative staff in the Air and Missile Defense Technology Division served on the Theater Critical Measurements Program team, which conducted measurement campaigns during the 1990s that provided the ballistic missile defense community with both data and capability demonstrations important to the development and testing of technologies for missile defense.

Photo of the TCMP teamLTG Patrick O'Reilly of the MDA (third from left) presented the 2010 MDA Technology Achievement Award to the Theater Critical Measurements Program team, from left, Dr. Keh-Ping Dunn, Christopher Johnson, David Immerman, Dr. Paul Temple (Strategic Defense Initiative Organization and MIT Lincoln Laboratory [retired]), Dr. Daniel O'Connor, Dr. Donald Coe, and Charles Jennings (U.S. Space and Missile Defense Command).

Dr. R. Louis Bellaire, leader of the Intelligence and Decision Technologies Group, was a member of the Burnt Frost Team, a multiagency group of military and civilian experts in defense systems who, in 2008, developed a response to the threat of a malfunctioning U.S. satellite. The team's timely response enabled the U.S. military to destroy the satellite's fuel tank and disperse the toxic hydrazine fuel that had posed a risk to human life if the satellite were to have reentered in a populated area.

Photo of Burnt Frost teamThe Burnt Frost Team above received an MDA Technology Achievement Award for its timely response to a malfunctioning U.S. satellite. Front row, from left to right, Scott Perry (MDA—Aegis Ballistic Missile Defense), Dr. R. Louis Bellaire (MIT Lincoln Laboratory), Dr. Anthony DeSimone (Lockheed Martin), and Dr. Gary Sullins (Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory); back row, left to right, Richard Hussey (Raytheon), F. Scott Parks (Boeing), Paul Smith (Boeing), and John Bier (MDA—Ground-Based Midcourse Defense).

Posted April 2010


Eighteen from MIT Lincoln Laboratory receive 2010 MIT Excellence Awards

Eighteen Lincoln Laboratory employees have been named 2010 recipients of MIT Excellence Awards. On 3 March, this year's recipients were recognized at a ceremony in MIT's Kresge Auditorium.
The Laboratory's honorees are

  • Lincoln Laboratory Technical Women’s Network Planning Committee – Fostering Diversity and Inclusion Award. The committee includes Leslie Weiner Alger, Advanced Satcom Systems and Operations Group; Emily Anesta, Air Defense Techniques Group; Nadya Bliss, Embedded Digital Systems Group; Hsiao-hua Burke, Air and Missile Defense Technology Division; Eva Cardarelli, Human Resources Department; Elizabeth Gustowt Champagne, Advanced Concepts and Technology Group; Melissa Choi, Systems and Analysis Group; Aimee D’Onofrio, ISR Systems and Architectures Group; Ellen Johnson, Advanced Electro-optical Systems Group; Karen Springford, Space Situational Awareness Group; Vyshnavi Suntharalingam, Advanced Imaging Technology Group; Anne Grover Vogel, Optical Systems Engineering Group; Christine Wang, Electro-optical Materials and Devices Group; Michele Weatherwax, Engineering Analysis Group; Marilyn Wolfson, Weather Sensing Group; and Tamara Yu, Information Systems Technology Group.
  • Michael Burke, Technical Communications – Serving the Client Award
  • Shawn S. Daley, Security Services Department – Unsung Hero Award

The MIT Excellence Awards acknowledge the efforts made by members of the MIT community toward fulfilling the goals, values, and mission of the Institute. Professionalism, commitment to best practices, and high standards of excellence are at the heart of these awards. More information about the MIT Excellence Awards, a component of the Rewards and Recognition Program, can be found at http://hrweb.mit.edu/rewards/excellence.

Posted March 2010


Shakti Davis is named 2010 Most Promising Engineer

Photo of Shakti DavisDr. Shakti K. Davis, a technical staff member in MIT Lincoln Laboratory's Advanced RF Sensing and Exploitation Group, was named Most Promising Engineer or Scientist for 2010 at the U.S. Black Engineer of the Year Award (BEYA) Conference held this 18 to 20 February in Baltimore.

Dr. Davis was recognized for demonstrating the potential to make significant contributions to technical fields. At Lincoln Laboratory, she is investigating adaptive-array signal processing and its radar applications. She has also worked on algorithm improvements to enable enhanced capabilities for air and space-borne radars. Dr. Davis is a member of the Lincoln Laboratory Technical Women's Network, which promotes the recruitment, professional development, and retention of women technical staff through sharing resources, mentoring, and networking.

A 2006 graduate of the doctoral program in electrical and computer engineering at the University of Wisconsin, Dr. Davis has published in five refereed journals and delivered papers at six conferences. Her graduate research focused on the use of microwave technology for breast cancer detection and analysis. She has applied for a U.S. patent for "Microwave-Based Examination Using Hypothesis Testing," a technology that uses microwave signals from multiple antenna locations to detect tumors.

Dr. Davis, who earned a BS degree at the New Mexico State University in 1999, won an IBM Almaden Research Internship Award in 1999, was selected for a grant from the AT&T Laboratories Fellowship Program from 2000 to 2006, and was a 2004–2006 National Institutes of Health Predoctoral Fellow.

The BEYA Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) Global Competitiveness Conference, founded in 1986 to offer the latest information on topics affecting African-American STEM professionals, brings together leaders in technology and business. Each year at the three-day event, the BEYA Awards Ceremony recognizes the achievements of African-American scientists and engineers.

Posted March 2010


Tso Yee Fan and David R. McElroy receive 2009 Technical Excellence Awards

Dr. Tso Yee Fan, Associate Leader of the Laser Technology and Applications Group at MIT Lincoln Laboratory, and Dr. David R. McElroy, Leader of the Laboratory's Advanced Satcom Systems and Operations Group, are the recipients of the 2009 MIT Lincoln Laboratory Technical Excellence Awards, presented to them by Dr. Eric D. Evans, Director, at a ceremony held in the Laboratory's auditorium on 22 January 2010.

Dr. Fan was honored for innovation in the solid-state laser field by demonstrating the first diode-pumped Yb laser and by pioneering both the use of cryogenics for scaling solid-state lasers to high power with excellent efficiency and techniques for laser beam combining.

Dr. McElroy was honored for sustained contributions to the Department of Defense’s MILSATCOM program, for critical contributions to the nation's communications priority, and for perfecting a method to transition Lincoln Laboratory technology to industry through the use of "gold standard" test instruments.

T.Y. Fan with award  
D.R. McElroy with award  
The MIT Lincoln Laboratory Technical Excellence Award recipients T.Y. Fan (center in top photo) and David McElroy (center bottom photo) are congratulated by Lincoln Laboratory Director Eric Evans (right) and their respective division heads, David Shaver (top photo), Solid State Division, and Scott Stadler (bottom photo), Communications and Information Technology Division.
 

At the ceremony, Dr. Evans also presented awards for the MIT Lincoln Laboratory Best Paper and Best Invention of 2009. Dr. Mykel J. Kochenderfer, Matthew W.M. Edwards, Leo P. Espindle, Dr. James K. Kuchar, and J. Daniel Griffith received the Best Paper Award for "Airspace Encounter Models for Estimating Collision Risk," which will be published in early 2010 in the AIAA Journal of Guidance, Control, and Dynamics. Dr. Eric A. Dauler and Dr. Andrew J. Kerman of Lincoln Laboratory, along with coauthors Prof. Karl K. Berggren, Dr. Joel Yang, and Dr. Vikas Anant of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, received the Best Invention Award for Multi-element Optical Detectors with Sub-wavelength Gaps.

Best Paper awardees Recipients of the 2009 MIT Lincoln Laboratory Best Paper Award, left to right, James Kuchar, Daniel Griffith, Leo Espindle, and Mykel Kochenderfer, are congratulated by Director Eric Evans. Absent from photo is Matthew Edwards.
Best Invention awardees Recipients of the 2009 MIT Lincoln Laboratory Best Invention Award, left to right, Eric Dauler, Karl Berggren, and Vikas Anant, receive congratulations from Director Eric Evans. Absent from photo are Andrew Kerman and Joel Yang.

 

Posted February 2010


Douglas A. Reynolds and Grant H. Stokes named IEEE Fellows

Dr. Douglas A. Reynolds, Senior Staff member in MIT Lincoln Laboratory's Information Systems Technology Group, and Dr. Grant H. Stokes, Head of the Laboratory's Aerospace Division, were named Fellows of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), effective 1 January 2010.

The IEEE is the world's leading professional association for the advancement of technology. Fellow status in the IEEE recognizes exceptional distinction in one’s profession and is conferred based on accomplishments that "contributed importantly to the advancement or application of engineering, science, and technology, bringing the realization of significant value to society."

Photo of Douglas ReynoldsReynolds was recognized for "contributions to Gaussian-mixture-model techniques for automatic speaker recognition." As a Senior Staff member, he provides technical oversight for projects in speaker and language recognition and speech-content-based information retrieval. His primary research is in the areas of robust speaker and language recognition algorithms and the development and deployment of speech technologies for U.S. Government applications. He has helped initiate speech processing programs with the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, the Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity, and several Department of Defense agencies. Reynolds has published over 50 conference and journal papers, provided tutorials on speaker and language processing, led research teams at the Johns Hopkins Human language Technology Summer Workshops, and founded the Odyssey Speaker Recognition Workshop series. He holds a PhD degree in electrical engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology and is a member of the IEEE Signal Processing Society's Speech Technical Committee.

Photo of Grant StokesStokes was recognized for "leadership in the development and implementation of advanced space search systems." As Head of the Aerospace Division, he is responsible for the Laboratory's programs in space control and electro-optical systems and technology. He supervised the transition of the first space-based space-surveillance system to Air Force dedicated sensor operations at the completion of an Advanced Concept Technology Demonstration program and initiated programs with the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency to develop next-generation technology for establishing space situational awareness. He also directs the development and operations of the Lincoln Near-Earth Asteroid Research program, which, as part of the NASA/Space Command partnership, has become the world's premiere asteroid search capability, finding approximately 50% of the near-Earth asteroids discovered since 1998. In 2009, he was honored with the Air Force Meritorious Civilian Service Award for his four years of service to the Air Force Scientific Advisory Board. He holds a PhD degree in physics from Princeton University and is a member of the International Astronomical Union and the IEEE Aerospace and Electronic Systems Society.

Posted December 2009


Alan Bernard receives Gormley Award

Alan D. Bernard, Principal Researcher at MIT Lincoln Laboratory, was presented with the National Defense Industrial Association's Rear Admiral Robert H. Gormley Combat Survivability Award for Leadership at a ceremony held on 5 November during the Aircraft Survivability Symposium 2009 at the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, California. He was recognized for "exceptional and visionary contributions to aircraft combat survivability, the Armed Forces and the nation." The award honors his 46 years of experience working with industry and the Department of Defense.

The Gormley Award is made to a person who has made outstanding contributions to combat survivability through sustained leadership in combat survivability design, program management, research and development, test and evaluation, modeling and simulation, education, or the development of standards. The National Defense Industrial Association is the nation's leading organization providing a forum for the exchange of information between Industry and government; its divisions, local chapters, and national events promote the development of innovative equipment and training for soldiers and first responders.

Bernard, who served from 2000 to 2004 as Associate Head of the Tactical Systems Technology Division, has been involved in research into technologies related to the survivability and lethality of modern military aircraft. He was a pioneer in using systems analysis to understand the interactions of survivability and technology. He led the Air Force Red Team activity evaluating stealth, countermeasures, and capabilities. From 1987 to 1999, as Leader of the Systems Analysis Group, he worked with a group of 60 researchers, modeling, synthesizing, and evaluating various concepts for the insertion of advanced technology into modern weapon systems. Bernard joined Lincoln Laboratory in 1972, and his early research focused on modeling the interaction of reentering objects with the atmosphere and validating these models with flight-test data from the Kwajalein Missile Range. He holds BS and MS degrees in physics, with a secondary concentration in mathematics, from the University of Connecticut. He is a member of Sigma Pi Sigma, the national physics honor society.

Photo of award presentationAt the Aircraft Survivability Symposium 2009, Brigadier General Stephen D. Mundt (second from the left), U.S. Army (ret.) and NDIA Combat Survivability Division executive board chair, presents Alan D. Bernard with the RADM Robert H. Gormley Combat Survivability Award for Leadership; Dr. Frank Swehosky, Symposium chair, is on the far left and RADM Gormley, U.S. Navy (ret.), is on the far right.

Posted December 2009


William Blackwell receives the 2009 NOAA–David Johnson Award

Photo of Wiliam BlackwellDr. William J. Blackwell, a member of the technical staff in the Sensor Technology and System Applications Group at MIT Lincoln Laboratory, received the 2009 National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)—David Johnson Award. The award was presented by Dr. Jane Lubchenco, Under Secretary of Commerce for Oceans and Atmosphere and Administrator of NOAA, at the Dr. Robert H. Goddard Memorial Dinner in Washington, D.C. on 17 April.

The David Johnson Award is given by the National Space Club in honor of the first administrator of the agency that became the NOAA National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service, and it recognizes young scientists who have developed innovative applications of Earth-observation satellite data that may be used "to assess and/or predict atmospheric, oceanic, or terrestrial conditions."

Blackwell was recognized for his work in neural network temperature and moisture retrieval algorithms and in microwave modeling and calibration in support of NOAA's forthcoming National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System and NASA's Aqua satellite, part of the NASA Earth Observing System that has been collecting vast amounts of data on the Earth’s weather and climate systems for almost ten years.

Since joining Lincoln Laboratory in 2002, Blackwell has focused his research in the area of atmospheric remote sensing, including the development and calibration of airborne and spaceborne microwave and hyperspectral infrared sensors, the retrieval of geophysical products from remote radiance measurements, and the application of electromagnetic, signal processing, and estimation theory. He holds a BEE degree from the Georgia Institute of Technology and SM and ScD degrees from MIT, all in electrical engineering.

Posted April 2009


John Zayhowski named a 2009 Fellow of the Optical Society of America

Dr. John J. Zayhowski, a senior staff member in the Laser Technology and Applications Group at Lincoln Laboratory, has been named a Fellow of the Optical Society of America (OSA) in recognition of "seminal contributions in miniature solid-state laser technology and laser applications and for pioneering work on microchip lasers."

The OSA, an international association of optics and photonics scientists, engineers, educators, and business leaders, was founded in 1916 to expand and disseminate knowledge of optics.

At Lincoln Laboratory, Zayhowski has worked on semiconductor devices, solid-state lasers, nonlinear optics, and electro-optic systems. His current focus is on the development of robust miniature solid-state laser systems. His work has resulted in sixteen U.S. patents and the formation of four companies.

A 2005 recipient of an MIT Lincoln Laboratory Technical Excellence Award, Zayhowski has published extensively on microchip and miniature lasers and has served on the Laboratory's Advanced Concepts Committee and New Technology Initiatives Board. He holds a joint BS and MS degree in electrical engineering and computer science and a PhD degree in electrical engineering from MIT.

Posted April 2009


Lincoln Laboratory earns Superior security rating

The U.S. Air Force 66th Security Forces Squadron awarded Lincoln Laboratory a "Superior" security rating for 2008. This rating was based upon the cumulative results of twelve comprehensive security inspections conducted on divisions, groups, and departments randomly chosen for evaluation. The Laboratory earned high ratings on security reviews performed between January and December 2008. The Laboratory's continued compliance with National Industrial Security Program requirements has earned it this third consecutive "Superior" rating.
 
Photo of ceremony for Superior security ratingEric Evans, Director (center left), and Shawn Daley, Chief Security Officer (center right), display the plaque honoring Lincoln Laboratory for earning a Superior security rating from the Air Force 66th Security Forces Squadron. Col David L. Orr, 66th Air Base Wing Commander (front left), represented the squadron at the ceremony. Leadership of the departments, divisions, and groups that achieved high scores in the 2008 security review are, from left to right, Joseph Flynn, Head of the Information Services Department; Gary Ahlgren, Leader of the Ranges and Test Beds Group; James Kuchar, Associate Leader of the Weather Sensing Group; James Gregory, Assistant Leader of the Advanced Imaging Technology Group; David Whited, Leader of the Space Control Systems Group; Marc Bernstein, Head of the Air and Missile Defense Technology Division; Aryeh Feder, Leader of the Systems and Analysis Group; David McElroy, Leader of the Advanced SATCOM Systems and Operations Group; Michael Languirand, Leader of the Optical Systems Engineering Group; Jeffrey Herd, Assistant Leader of the Advanced RF Sensing and Exploitation Group; Gregory Berthiaume, Leader of the Sensor Technology and System Applications Group; and Richard Heinrichs, Leader of the Active Optical Systems Group.

Posted April 2009


Allen D. Pillsbury and Benny J. Sheeks receive 2008 Technical Excellence Awards

Allen D. Pillsbury and Dr. Benny J. Sheeks are the recipients of the 2008 MIT Lincoln Laboratory Technical Excellence Awards, presented to them by Dr. Eric D. Evans, Director, at a ceremony held in the Laboratory's auditorium on 6 February 2009.

Mr. Pillsbury was honored for his innovation in the mechanical design of space-based sensors and optical communication systems, and his introduction of new technologies that demonstrate revolutionary performance gains for space systems.

Dr. Sheeks was honored for his analysis of radar observations of foreign and domestic ballistic missiles, his expertise in the utilization and interpretation of real-world ballistic missile radar data, and his techniques and results that have formed a critical cornerstone for the development of the Ballistic Missile Defense System.

Photo of Allen Pillsbury, Benny Sheeks, and Director Eric Evans Allen D. Pillsbury (left) and Dr. Benny J. Sheeks (center) are congratulated on their Technical Excellence Awards by Dr. Eric D. Evans (right), Director of Lincoln Laboratory.

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Posted February 2009


Four from Lincoln Laboratory receive 2009 MIT Excellence Awards

Four Lincoln Laboratory employees have been named 2009 recipients of MIT Excellence Awards. On 4 March, this year's recipients will be recognized at a ceremony in MIT's Kresge Auditorium.

The Laboratory's honorees are

  • Joanne Knoll of the Intelligence, Test, and Evaluation Group – Creating Connections Award
  • Andrea E. Lamberti of the Intelligence, Test, and Evaluation Group – Serving the Client Award.
  • Dr. Carl H. Fischer of the Sensor Technology and System Applications Group – Innovative Solutions Award
  • Antonio S. Ruscitti of the Sensor Technology and System Applications Group – Unsung Hero Award

The MIT Excellence Awards acknowledge the efforts made by members of the MIT community toward fulfilling the goals, values, and mission of the Institute. Professionalism, commitment to best practices, and high standards of excellence are at the heart of these awards. More information about the MIT Excellence Awards, a component of the Rewards and Recognition Program, can be found at http://hrweb.mit.edu/rewards/excellence.

Posted February 2009


Michael S. Brandstein and Darryl P. Greenwood named IEEE Fellows

Dr. Michael S. Brandstein, technical staff member in Lincoln Laboratory's Information Systems Technology Group, and Dr. Darryl P. Greenwood, principal Laboratory researcher in the Homeland Protection and Tactical Systems Division, were named Fellows of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), effective 1 January 2009.

The IEEE is the world's leading professional association for the advancement of technology. Fellow status in the IEEE recognizes exceptional distinction in one's profession and is conferred based on accomplishments that "contributed importantly to the advancement or application of engineering, science, and technology, bringing the realization of significant value to society."

Photo of Michael BrandsteinMichael S. Brandstein

Brandstein was recognized for "contributions to microphone array signal processing for speech and multimedia applications." Prior to joining Lincoln Laboratory, he was an assistant and associate professor of electrical engineering at Harvard University. His work at the Laboratory has focused on speech and audio signal enhancement. He has served as a chairman of the IEEE Signal Processing Society's Audio and Electroacoustics Technical Committee and as an associate editor for the IEEE Transactions on Speech and Audio Processing. He holds an ScB degree from Brown University, an SM degree from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and a PhD from Brown, all in electrical engineering.

Photo of Darryl GreenwoodDarryl. P. Greenwood

Greenwood was honored for "contributions to the design and performance of adaptive optical systems." During his career at Lincoln Laboratory, he has served as a group leader responsible for various beam control and adaptive optics programs; as associate head, then head, of the Optics Division; and as associate head in both the Aerospace and the Homeland Protection and Tactical Systems divisions. He has led the Laboratory mission in chemical and biological defense and currently is responsible for coordinating the Laboratory's energy initiatives. Greenwood is a Fellow of the Optical Society of America and a past member of the Air Force Scientific Advisory Board. He holds BS, MS, and PhD degrees in electrical engineering from the University of Texas at Austin.

Posted January 2009

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NASA honors Lincoln Laboratory researchers

NASA Group Achievement Award
Nineteen Lincoln Laboratory employees are among the recipients of the 2008 NASA Group Achievement Award for their participation in the Joint Flight Demonstration Test conducted in 2006 at NASA Ames Research Center in California. The award, presented to the team by Dr. S. Pete Worden (Brig Gen, USAF, ret.) at a ceremony held 11 June at the Ames Center, recognizes "exemplary performance in completing a series of flight tests comparing and validating air-to-air measurements between two separate airborne infrared sensor systems."

The Lincoln Laboratory recipients of this award are Dr. Kevin Cohen, Victor Cyrkler, Mehul Dhorajia, Allyn Dullighan, James Dunn, Kenneth Gregson, Kevin Johnson, Danial Lane, Charles Magnarelli, Robert Maynard, Bonnie McKowen, Lance Michael, Walter Moquin, James Morrissey, Robert Murray, Dr. Eliahu Niewood, Albert Theriault, Dr. James Truitt, and David Ventura.

2007 Paul F. Holloway Non-Aerospace Technology Transfer Award
Dr. Marilyn M. Wolfson, Dr. Haig Iskenderian, and Earle R. Williams of Lincoln Laboratory's Weather Sensing Group are among the recipients of the 2007 Paul F. Holloway Non-Aerospace Technology Transfer Award for their participation on the NASA Advanced Satellite Aviation-Weather Products Project Team. The award, which was presented at the Langley Research Center Honor Awards ceremony held on 17 July at NASA's Langley Research Center in Virginia, recognizes outstanding contributions to the development of new technology and significant participation in technology transfer activities.

Posted November 2008


R. Louis Bellaire receives Secretary of Defense Medal for Outstanding Public Service

Photo of R. Louis BellaireDr. R. Louis Bellaire, Assistant Leader in the Advanced Concepts and Technology Group at MIT Lincoln Laboratory, has been presented with an Office of the Secretary of Defense Medal for Outstanding Public Service for his distinguished service as Sensors Directorate Chief Engineer and Acting Technical Director, Deputy for Test Integration and Fielding, Missile Defense Agency, from September 2006 to February 2008.

During his service with the Missile Defense Agency, Dr. Bellaire assembled and led a cohesive team of scientists and engineers who delivered a synchronized sensors architecture that ensured a successful satellite engagement. He was commended for producing a viable, executable plan for each phase of this mission.

Dr. Bellaire joined Lincoln Laboratory in 1996. His work has focused on radar discrimination, tracking, and data fusion for ballistic missile defense applications. He has extensive experience in ground-based and sea-based missile defense systems, and from 2003 to 2006 he led the Laboratory's Forward Based Radar testbed program. Dr. Bellaire holds a BS degree in electrical engineering from Washington University and MSEE and PhD degrees in control systems and signal processing from the Georgia Institute of Technology.

Posted November 2008


Grant H. Stokes receives Air Force Meritorious Civilian Service Award

Photo of Grant H. StokesDr. Grant H. Stokes, Head of the Aerospace Division at MIT Lincoln Laboratory, was honored with the Air Force Meritorious Civilian Service Award for his four years of service to the Air Force Scientific Advisory Board (AFSAB). The award was presented to him during the board's meeting on 7 and 8 October.

Lincoln Laboratory members of the AFSAB—Dr. Hsiao-hua Burke, Associate Head of the Aerospace Division; Dr. Robert Shin, Head of the Homeland Protection and Tactical Systems Division; Dr. Eliahu Niewood, Assistant Head of the Engineering Division; and Dr. Jack Fleischman, Leader of the Space Systems Analysis Group—were in attendance at this meeting.

Posted October 2008


Lincoln Laboratory is among the recipients of the 2007 Collier Trophy

The National Aeronautic Association has awarded the 2007 Robert J. Collier Trophy to the Automatic Dependent Surveillance–Broadcast team of public and private-sector groups, which included MIT Lincoln Laboratory. The Collier Trophy is awarded annually for "for the greatest achievement in aeronautics or astronautics in America, with respect to improving the performance, efficiency, and safety of air or space vehicles." Past winners have included the teams who developed the F-22 Raptor, the Global Hawk unmanned aerial vehicle, and the Space Shuttle.

Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B) is a system in which each aircraft broadcasts its aircraft-determined position, intent, and status information on the order of once each second. This broadcast position information can be received by other aircraft and by ground stations, providing robust air-to-ground and air-to-air surveillance. 

Lincoln Laboratory played a critical role in the conception, development, and testing of ADS-B, and continues to support the Federal Aviation Administration's (FAA's) national implementation program. In 1992, Lincoln Laboratory proposed to the FAA the use of an expanded Mode-S squitter for the transmission of aircraft-derived position. This concept evolved into the current ADS-B that allows aircraft to broadcast and receive ADS-B information using existing transponder equipment. It has been adopted worldwide as the commercial fleet's standard for ADS-B implementation. 

The Lincoln Laboratory ADS-B team included Peter G. Amos, Ed Bayliss (retired), D. Jonathan Bernays, Robert E. Boisvert, Walter L. Brown, Richard W. Bush, Steven R. Bussolari, Paul R. Drouilhet, Ann C. Drumm, James M. Flavin, Jeffrey L. Gertz, Robert D. Grappel, Ralph K. Halvorsen, William H. Harman, George Knittel (retired), James K. Kuchar, Raymond R. LaFrey (retired), John A. Maccini, Charles J. Magnarelli, Christopher P. McNeil, Walter A. Moquin, Vincent A. Orlando, W. Michael Radoslovich, Kenneth W. Saunders (former employee), Katherine A. Sinclair, Steven D. Thompson, and M. Loren Wood.

Posted August 2008


Serpil Ayasli, former researcher at Lincoln Laboratory, receives award for excellence in radar engineering

Photo of Serpil AyasliDr. Serpil Ayasli, former technical staff member and Associate Group Leader at MIT Lincoln Laboratory, received the 2008 Warren D. White Award for Excellence in Radar Engineering for her contributions to ultra-wideband radar for ground and foliage penetration. This award, granted by the IEEE Aerospace and Electronics Systems Society (AESS), was established "to recognize a radar engineer for outstanding achievements due to a major technical advance, or a series of advances over time, in the art of radar engineering."

Dr. Ayasli, who worked at Lincoln Laboratory from 1982 until her retirement in 2006, served as a technical staff member, assistant group leader, and associate group leader in various groups within the Tactical Systems Technology and the Sensor Systems divisions (now the Homeland Protection/Tactical Systems and the ISR Systems and Technology divisions). Her work at the Laboratory focused on air defense and surface surveillance radar research and development, including radar propagation, clutter modeling, radar system analysis, and foliage penetration (FOPEN) and ground penetration (GPEN) radar.

Dr. Ayasli and her team's work at Lincoln Laboratory led to the first successful experimental proof of the feasibility of an advanced coherent FOPEN radar system that would enable detection and tracking of targets in foliage. Recognizing the importance of keeping the scientific and user communities informed on the development of surface surveillance and FOPEN/GPEN technologies, she instituted a workshop dedicated to those technologies (most recently named Surface Surveillance Technology Workshop) that was held annually at Lincoln Laboratory from 2001 to 2005.

Dr. Ayasli has served as a member of the IEEE/AESS Radar System Panel. She was a corecipient of the IEEE/AESS 1996 M. Barry Carlton Award and was named an IEEE Fellow in 2002. She holds a BS degree in electrical engineering and MS and PhD degrees in physics from the Middle East Technical University in Ankara, Turkey.

Posted July 2008


Lincoln Laboratory earns Superior security rating

The U.S. Air Force 66th Security Forces Squadron awarded Lincoln Laboratory a “Superior” security rating for 2007. This rating was based upon the cumulative results of security inspections conducted on eight technical groups, two divisions, one service department, and the flight facility. These twelve randomly chosen candidates for inspection earned high ratings on comprehensive security reviews performed between January and December 2007. The Laboratory’s continued compliance with National Industrial Security Program requirements has earned it this second consecutive “Superior” rating.

Photo: Shawn Daley, Chief Security Officer, and Eric Evans, Director, display the plaque commending Lincoln Laboratory for attaining a Superior security rating from the Air Force 66th Security Forces Squadron.Shawn Daley, Chief Security Officer (center left), and Eric Evans, Director (center right), display the plaque commending Lincoln Laboratory for attaining a Superior security rating from the Air Force 66th Security Forces Squadron. The staff surrounding them are leaders of the divisions and groups that achieved high ratings in the 2007 security reviews.

Posted July 2008

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Lincoln Laboratory team earns Bike-to-Work Week Award

Lincoln Laboratory joined the Bay State in celebrating Bike-to-Work Week from May 12 to 18. This was the Laboratory’s first year registered as a corporate team. With record participation in the event, Lincoln Laboratory won the challenge for best percentage of participation of employees cycling to work among companies with 1501 to 3000 employees.

Photo of Lincoln Laboratory bike teamThe Lincoln Laboratory Bike-to-Work team won this year's award for having the best percentage of employee participation.

The Laboratory had 78 cyclists who pledged 4293 miles, the average trip being 18.5 miles. Of the 129 companies registered for the event, Lincoln Laboratory was the only company located outside of Boston to win an award. Employees who live too far away to bike the entire round trip were encouraged to bike one way or a partial route, using MBTA or carpools for the remainder of the commute.

Bike-to-Work team holding trophy aloftMembers of the Bike-to-Work team celebrate winning the raised trophy.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted July 2008


David R. Martinez receives Eminent Engineer Award

Photo of David R. MartinezDavid R. Martinez, Head of the Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (ISR) Systems and Technology Division, received an Eminent Engineer Award from New Mexico State University College of Engineering. The award was presented by Dean Steven P. Castillo during a ceremony held on May 9, 2008. This award is given to alumni who have distinguished themselves in their field of study.

Mr. Martinez joined MIT Lincoln Laboratory in 1988 and was responsible for the development of a large prototype space-time adaptive signal processor. As Division Head, he oversees programs in the development of advanced techniques and prototypes for surface surveillance, laser systems, active and passive adaptive array processing, integrated sensing and decision support, undersea warfare, and embedded hardware and software computing. Before joining the Laboratory, he was a principal research engineer at ARCO Oil and Gas Company, responsible for a multidisciplinary project to demonstrate the viability of real-time adaptive signal processing techniques.

The holder of three U.S. patents, Mr. Martinez served on the Army Science Board from 1999 to 2004. He is the founder and past chairman of a national workshop on high performance embedded computing. He has been an associate editor to the IEEE Signal Processing Magazine. In 2003, he was named an IEEE Fellow; in 2007, he served on the Defense Science Board ISR Task Force.

Mr. Martinez holds a BS degree from New Mexico State University, an MS degree from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), and an EE degree jointly from MIT and the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. He completed an MBA from the Southern Methodist University and has attended the Program for Senior Executives in National and International Security at the John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University.

Posted June 2008


Antonio F. Pensa named Penn State 2008 Outstanding Engineering Alumnus

Photo of Antonio PensaDr. Antonio F. Pensa, Assistant Director of MIT Lincoln Laboratory, was selected a 2008 Outstanding Engineering Alumnus of the Pennsylvania State University. The award, presented at a ceremony on 21 April 2008, is given to alumni who have “reached exceptional levels of professional achievement.”

Dr. Pensa joined Lincoln Laboratory in 1969 and initially worked on reentry systems and air traffic control programs. Subsequently, he was responsible for the development and implementation of the coherent integration tracking that led to the realization of a U.S. operational deep-space radar capability. He was also instrumental in establishing the space surveillance program at Lincoln Laboratory.

Dr. Pensa has served on most of the Air Force Space Surveillance Architecture Studies since 1972 and is considered a national expert in the techniques and sensors associated with surveillance of space and from space. Currently, he is responsible for military space activities, including those in support of the National Reconnaissance Office, and the Laboratory’s space control programs.

A past member of the Air Force Scientific Advisory Board, Dr. Pensa also served on the Defense Science Board (DSB) Task Force on Space Superiority and the DSB/SAB (Science Advisory Board) Task Force on National Security Space. He is the recipient of the National Reconnaissance Office Director’s Award for Distinguished Service, the Air Force Award for Distinguished Service, and the NASA Group Achievement Award.

Posted June 2008


Lincoln Laboratory's GOES-N Series Team receives NASA Group Achievement Award

Image of GOES satelliteThe GOES-13 satellite

Lincoln Laboratory's Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES)-N Series Team led by Dr. Gregory D. Berthiaume, Leader of the Sensor Technology and System Applications Group, received a Group Achievement Award from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) administrator, Michael Griffin. The award, presented by the GOES-N Project Manager Steven Kirkner and the Deputy Project Manager Andre Dress in February 2008, was for "providing the next generation of advanced weather satellites" and for the team’s support to the launch and on-orbit performance verification of the GOES-13 satellite. Team members included Kristin A. Clouser of the Space Control Systems Group, and Joshua Model, Dr. John O. Taylor, and Robert M. Wezalis of the Sensor Technology and System Applications Group.

GOES-13 was handed over to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) in January 2007 as an operationally ready satellite. This marked the conclusion of a highly successful launch and on-orbit checkout of the first GOES-N series satellite. NOAA assigns a letter to the satellite before it is launched, and a number once it has achieved orbit. For example, GOES-N, once in orbit, is designated GOES-13. GOES-13 will be placed at 105°W, replenishing NOAA’s on-orbit space capability, allowing a rapid recovery of a failed operational GOES satellite.

GOES satellites provide continuous monitoring necessary for intensive data analysis. They circle the Earth in a geosynchronous orbit, which means they orbit the equatorial plane of the Earth at a speed matching the Earth's rotation. This allows them to hover continuously over one position on the surface. The geosynchronous plane is about 35,800 km (22,300 miles) above the Earth, high enough to allow the satellites a full-disc view of the Earth. Because they stay above a fixed spot on the surface, they provide a constant vigil for the atmospheric "triggers" for severe weather conditions such as tornadoes, flash floods, hail storms, and hurricanes. When these conditions develop, the GOES satellites are able to monitor storm development and track their movements.

GOES satellite imagery (viewable at http://www.goes.noaa.gov/) is also used to estimate rainfall during the thunderstorms and hurricanes for flash flood warnings, as well as to estimate snowfall accumulations and overall extent of snow cover. Such data help meteorologists issue winter storm warnings and spring snow melt advisories. Real-time GOES-13 images can be viewed at http://rammb.cira.colostate.edu/ramsdis/online/goes-13.asp.

Posted June 2008


Don Boroson and Bernadette Johnson awarded 2007 Technical Excellence Awards

Dr. Don M. BorosonThe 2007 MIT Lincoln Laboratory Technical Excellence Awards were presented to Dr. Don M. Boroson and Dr. Bernadette Johnson at a ceremony held on 8 February 2008.

Dr. Boroson was honored for his contributions to the field of modulation and coding techniques as applied to optical communications systems. His efforts have transformed this field from one of mainly theoretical interest to one of broad national impact.

Dr. Bernadette JohnsonDr. Johnson was honored for her system-level architecting, technical innovation, and prototype demonstration in multiple areas and, in particular, nontraditional problems. She has applied traditional Laboratory research approaches to novel areas and is nationally recognized in the biodefense field.

Initiated by the Director’s Office in 2001, the year of Lincoln Laboratory’s fiftieth anniversary, the Technical Excellence Award recognizes exceptional, sustained excellence that has had significant impact on a Laboratory mission area. more ›

Posted February 2008


Roger W. Sudbury elected IEEE Director-Elect

Roger W. SudburyRoger W. Sudbury, Director's Office Staff, has been elected as IEEE Director-Elect for its Division IV, Electromagnetics and Radiation. He will serve as Director-Elect in 2008 and on the IEEE Board of Directors in 2009 and 2010. The IEEE (Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers) is the world's largest professional association for the advancement of technology with over 370,000 members worldwide.

A Fellow of the IEEE, Mr. Sudbury has served the Institute in many capacities. He has been a member of the IEEE Technical Activities Board and its Strategic Planning and Review Committee. He has served as chair of the Conference Publications Committee, as Technical Activities Board liaison to the Regional Activities Board, and as vice chair of the IEEE Membership Development Committee. He served as chair of the Continuing Professional Education Committee and on the IEEE Educational Activities Board. A Past-President of the IEEE Microwave Theory and Techniques Society, he currently serves as the MTT Awards Committee Chair and on the IEEE Awards Board Presentation and Publicity Committee. He has also served on the Steering Committee of the IEEE International Microwave Symposium and its Technical Program Committee.

Mr. Sudbury is the former Executive Officer at MIT Lincoln Laboratory. He led the development of high-frequency solid-state components for active-element phased-array radars, served as advisor to the government on GaAs multichip transceiver module development, and served as associate manager of Lincoln Laboratory’s Kiernan Reentry Measurements Site on the Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands. He holds a BEE with highest honors from the Georgia Institute of Technology and the SM and Engineer (EE) degrees from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. From 1964 to 1966, he served in the U.S. Army attaining the rank of Captain. 

Posted February 2008


Eight from Lincoln Laboratory receive 2008 MIT Excellence Awards

Eight Lincoln Laboratory employees have been named 2008 recipients of MIT Excellence Awards. On 26 February, the recipients were honored at a ceremony held at MIT’s Kresge Auditorium.

The following people are the 2008 honorees:

  • Dr. Ronald J. Legere, technical staff in the Tactical Defense Systems Group – Fostering Community Award
  • Margarita Hiett, associate technical staff in the Space Systems Analysis Group – Innovative Solutions Award
  • James C. Dunn, technical staff in the Tactical Defense Systems Group, and Gary A. Hackett, administrative staff in Human Resources – Unsung Hero Awards
  • The Visitor Reception Services Team consisting of Roslyn R. Wesley, Karen M. Allen, Thomas J. Zech, and Dollina F.M. Borella from the Security Services Department – Serving the Client Award.

The MIT Excellence Awards acknowledge the efforts made by members of the MIT community toward fulfilling the goals, values, and mission of the Institute. Professionalism, commitment to best practices, and high standards of excellence are at the heart of these awards. More information about the MIT Excellence Awards, a component of the Rewards and Recognition Program, can be found at http://hrweb.mit.edu/rewards/excellence.

Posted February 2008

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David C. Shaver named IEEE Fellow

Dr. David C. ShaverDr. David C. Shaver, Head of the Solid State Division at MIT Lincoln Laboratory, was recently named a Fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) “for leadership in semiconductor microlithography and microfabrication technology.”

The IEEE is the world’s leading professional association for the advancement of technology. Fellow status in the IEEE recognizes exceptional distinction in one’s profession and is conferred based on accomplishments that “contributed importantly to the advancement or application of engineering, science, and technology, bringing the realization of significant value to society.”

Dr. Shaver’s work in optical lithography technology contributed significantly to changing the semiconductor industry’s lithography road map. He oversaw a Lincoln Laboratory team that pioneered the development of 193 nm wavelength optical lithography. Silicon integrated circuit manufacturing worldwide now relies on 193 nm lithography for volume manufacturing.

Dr. Shaver has played a key role in defining Lincoln Laboratory’s research focus, driving the development of photon-counting detector arrays that are widely acknowledged to have a transforming impact on three-dimensional imaging and high-speed communication systems.

Dr. Shaver holds four U.S. patents, has authored numerous technical articles for peer-reviewed publications, and is a member of the Semiconductor Industry Association’s Lithography Technology Working Group as well as a participant in the Department of Defense’s Advisory Group on Electron Devices.

Posted January 2008


William P. Delaney presented with Department of the Navy Award

William P. DelaneyWilliam P. Delaney, Director’s Office Fellow, was presented with a Department of the Navy Superior Public Service Award. The citation, presented by the Honorable Delores Etter, Assistant Secretary of the Navy, was for exceptionally outstanding service as chairman of the Advanced Sensor Technology Executive Advisory Panel from November 1997 to July 2004. The panel, which provided long-range vision and advice to senior Navy leadership, recommended an extensive range of mission capabilities for advanced sensors and was instrumental in the deployment of the Littoral Surveillance Radar System, the nation’s most advanced airborne surveillance radar. Mr. Delaney’s contribution was recognized in his certificate of award: “The positioning of the Littoral Surveillance Radar System at the forefront of our combat operations is due in no small part to his leadership and direct personal intervention.”

Mr. Delaney was Assistant Director of Lincoln Laboratory, and from 1973 to 1976, he served in the Office of the Secretary of Defense, with responsibilities for research and development in strategic defense systems. He has held management positions in missile defense, air defense, air traffic control, and battlefield surveillance, all involving radar systems. At Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands, he led the ALCOR wideband radar project. He has served on many government committees, including the Air Force Scientific Advisory Board and the Defense Science Board. He holds a BEE degree from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and an SMEE degree from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Posted January 2008


Benny J. Sheeks receives 2007 Jamieson Award

Dr. Benny SheeksDr. Benny J. Sheeks, senior staff in the Intelligence, Test, and Evaluation Group at MIT Lincoln Laboratory, was named by the Military Sensing Symposium (MSS) on Missile Defense Sensors, Environments, and Algorithms (MD-SEA) as a recipient of the 2007 Jamieson Award.

The MD-SEA established the Jamieson Award to honor the work of John A. Jamieson, who made significant contributions to passive infrared programs for missile defense. The award is given to those who have made outstanding contributions to the MD-SEA technical community.

At the 2007 symposium, Dr. Sheeks was given this award in recognition of his “consistently presenting outstanding analyses of radar data.” Since 1979, he has been devoting his efforts at Lincoln Laboratory to analyzing data from the Cobra Dane, the Cobra Judy, and other radars.

Posted January 2008

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